My Confederate Ancestors

I did not know much about the War Between the States until I started doing genealogical research. I have learned some since I started searching for information on my relatives, but I realize that I still do not know a great deal about the history of the War because there is so much to learn. I recall noticing as a child that my great-great Ridgeway grandfather's grave marker had SCV engraved on it as well as an unusual marker (a CSA marker) as a foot stone. At that time I did not know what the symbols represented. Through my research, I began to understand what those symbols stand for. Virtually every able-bodied man from Clarendon and Sumter Counties, South Carolina served the Confederacy. Six of my direct ancestors served together in Company I, 25th Infantry Regiment of the South Carolina Volunteers. (I found out what SCV stood for.) As I read though what paperwork is left of their service records, the hardship, pain, and great losses that they endured became quite poignant. My three Haley ggg grandfathers were brothers. They enlisted together. Two came back from the war. One rests forever in the north, in a prison camp graveyard. John Ridgeway, brother of my gg grandfather, Peter, did not survive. He too rests at Elmira, far away from his Clarendon County home. The South sacrificed so much.

Family tradition and history tell me that the war was fought over states' rights. "Secession belongs to a different class of remedies. It is to be justified upon the basis that the States are sovereign. There was a time when none denied it. I hope the time may come again, when a better comprehension of the theory our government, and inalienable rights of the people of the States will prevent anyone from denying that each State is a sovereign, and thus may reclaim the grants which it has made to an agent whomsoever" (From the farewell address given by Jefferson Davis to the US Senate, January 21,1861.) My ancestors did not take up arms, leave their families and home, suffer and die to keep their slaves. They had no slaves. They took up arms to protect their homeland from invasion. Ninety percent of the residents of the South did not own slaves. In fact one of the largest land and slave owners in Sumter County, South Carolina was a black man. I mention this because it bothers me to have non-Southerners learn that I have Confederate ancestors and automatically assume something about me by way of my ancestors, that is not true. I have known of African Americans who were researching their roots, and when they discovered that their ancestor was not a slave, but a slave owner they became very, very upset. I do not like the thought that any of my ancestors might have owned slaves. It upsets me too. I am sure that some of my ancestors in earlier generations did own slaves, as I have seen mention of it in the early King's land grant records from before the Revolutionary War, but none of my direct line ancestors who were in Company I of the 25th Regiment, Company I of the 23rd Regiment, nor my Ridgeway ancestor who was in the 7th Cavalry owned anyone. They were farmers or planters, with large families. They were what the majority of Southerners were and are now - middle class.

From correspondence with and finally getting to meet a distant cousin who considers herself to be tri-racial, I have come to feel that it was not so much what color you were way back when, it was your economic status in life that determined who you associated with, who you married. Through her, I learned that two of the sisters of my ggg grandmother, Mellerson Ridgeway Lowder (all of whom were white) after the war married brothers who were designated as mulatto or Indian, according to which census you are viewing at the time. At least one of the brothers had enlisted for Confederate service. Why ? He, like most of his neighbors could not have entered confederate service the over the issue of slavery. He owned no slaves. He obviously enlisted as did my ancestors, in the defense of his homeland. My great great grandfathers, Peter Ridgeway, Joseph E. Richburg, my Lowder great-great grandfather, nor were my great great grandfathers, the three Haley brothers were slave owners. They went to war to fight for the rights of South Carolina as a sovereign state. Since most of the fighting during the war took place on Southern soil, Southern patriotism was enough to unite Southerners, even though the majority of the population did not own slaves.

The South left the union over state's rights. South Carolina had come very near to leaving the union over the same issue, decades before. If it had happened then, would there have been no great war and so much lost? Could not slavery have died its own quiet death and then there would have been no horrible war of American against American. What most needs to be understood by those who denigrate the Confederate symbol is that to a native Southerner with deep roots here, it does not represent slavery, nor does it represent segregation. Those horrid institutions are long gone. To so many of us, the symbol represents the South, our homeland. For so many it recalls to mind our ancestors who stood together for what they believed in, whether right or wrong, winners or losers; they were our ancestors. Their blood is my blood. They fought, not to conquer, but for the right to choose their own destinies. They lost, but they fought for what they felt was right for them, at that time in history.

What some call today "The American Civil War" was not in fact a "civil" war at all, in terms of being an internal insurrection. It was an armed conflict between two separate nations, each with its own government and national goals. The fortunes of war have always dictated that the vanquished suffer not one - but two- defeats at the hands of their conquerors. The vanquished lose not only the war but the official telling of it when the war is over. The victors have the means and the mission of making the records serve their own purposes. The story of this war follows that pattern. One generation must not succeed the next without having an appreciation of who they are and what they are and how they came to be that way.

The Confederate flag is part of our history. It represents a time when fellow Southerners came together to fight against a greater force. It will always be just a symbol. It is not a symbol of slavery, nor of white against black, but to me and other deep rooted Southerners, it is simply symbolic of the Southland. I don't wear it. I don't fly it, but I understand it. To see the flag or to hear Dixie, brings to my mind the scent of yellow jessamine laced through a breeze so thick that you can almost see it, spanish moss, gray like an old man's beard hanging thickly from the limbs of giant oaks, a river flowing black as tea with the tannic acid from cypress trees in the swamps, sand hills reminiscent of that ancient ocean, the High Hills of the Santee, children calling their parents Mama and Daddy, the unique cadence of my grandmother's almost low country, but not quite accent, good manners, iced tea, pound cake, azaleas, magnolias, and most of all home. To so many it represents a part of our history, which is long past. It should be honored as such. That honor does no longer includes flying atop the South Carolina Statehouse. This is due to the fact that the Confederate flag has been used wrongly by too many as a symbol of divisiveness. Only during the 1960s, was the flag first hoisted to fly above the South Carolina statehouse. Raising the flag at that point in time has caused others to view it as a symbol of hatred.

The compromise has been to fly the flag on the grounds of the statehouse. Such a compromise does not signify turning our backs on our history, but of stepping forward into the future, together, with an understanding that the flag does not represent hatred or division, but is a symbol of the Southland. If not for our history, none of us would be who we are, or where we are today. To fully understand our history, we must grasp how each individual's view of the world developed and how that view was created by the reality of the people who have lived before us. The history of the Confederate cause is part of my history. I cannot trace back on any of my ancestral lines and not find a male ancestor who did not serve. If our ancestors had not taken their places in history, we might not be who, nor where we are at this moment in time.

 

For the survivors, the war was the most intense experience of their entire lives. Nothing afterward was to be the same. Those who were survivors understood that a strong young man astride his horse with the sun shining brightly, might be a mutilated corpse in an hour. Those who lived through the war were forever changed and in a way much removed from those who had stayed at home and not lived though Morris Island, the Crater, Fort Fisher, and Elmira.

Most of my Confederate ancestors that I have been able to trace thus far, served in Company I of the 25th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers. They enlisted at Manning. My great-great-grandfather, Peter Edward Ridgeway served with Company I, 7th Cavalry Regiment. He enlisted in Sumter. My great-great grandfather David Oscar Brunson served in Company I of the 23rd Regiment. He lived at Davis Station and enlisted at Summerton. I am still doing research to find out which of my other ancestors served. I have two more Richbourg g-g-g-grandfathers who would have been in their late 30s or early 40s. I imagine that they served together somewhere as they were brothers, but I haven't located what unit they were with at this time. Most of my ancestors made it back from the war. A number of them were captured at Fort Fisher near Wilmington, North Carolina. After the surrender of the Confederate armies, the soldiers began to make their way home again. They traveled as best they could, some on foot, and some on horses as thin and weak as they were themselves. Harvey V. Haley died a Prisoner of War at the infamous Elmira Prison Camp in New York state. He left behind his wife, the mother of my great-great grandfather, J. Edgar Haley. Harvey Haley's brothers, Isaac and Friendly came home. My great- great grandfather, Joseph Edward Richbourg married Louisa Guess on November 22, 1866. Peter Edward Ridgeway married my great great grandmother Margaret Jane Barfield after the war on January 6, 1866. Her sister, Susan Covert Barfield married Isaac Andrew Haley on January 28, 1868. My great great - great grandfather Friendly Haley married the sister of my great - great grandfather, Peter Ridgeway. Her name was Charity. They were probably married in 1867 or 1868 as their first child was born in 1869. They both died before the CSA pension came along so they did not leave applications behind to be studied. My great - great grandfather, James Owens Lowder was imprisoned at Elmira and survived. He made it home to Clarendon County, yet once home, sadly, he lived only a few short months. A terrible storm occurred near Manning on Sunday, July 22, 1866. James Owens Lowder was killed along with his small child that he was holding. They were crushed by a falling tree. He had been married to Mellerson Ridgeway. She later married a Barwick. One must understand that my family tree is truly a vine winding in and out the annals of time in Clarendon County, South Carolina.

The following is an excerpt from a poem by Maurice Thompson (1844-1901). The entire poem was too long to include here. This is a poem of reconciliation. It shows the kinship felt by men on both sides who had fought in the war and their common scorn for civilians who tried to carry on the hatreds that the soldiers, on both sides, feel that the war should have buried. A sense of divine providence can be vaguely felt. Without directly saying so, the writer lets one know that the war turned out for the best.

An Address by an Ex-Confederate Soldier to the Grand Army of the Republic by Maurice Thompson   I was a rebel, if you please, A reckless fighter to the last, Nor do I fall upon my knees And ask forgiveness for the past.   A traitor? I a traitor? No! I was a patriot to the core; The South was mine, I loved her so, I gave her all,-I could no more.   You scowl at me. And was it wrong To wear the gray my father wore? Could I slink back, though young and strong, From foes before my mother's door?   But all in vain. In dull despair I saw the storm of conflict die; Low lay the Southern banner fair, And yonder flag was waving high.   My mother, gray and bent with years, Hoarding love's withered aftermath, Her sweet eyes burnt too dry for tears, Sat in the dust of Sherman's path.   My boyhood's home, a blackened heap Where lizards crawled and briars grew, Had felt the fire of vengeance creep, The crashing round-shot hurtle through.   That was a dark night; but day is here, The crowning victory is won; Hark, how the sixty million cheer, With Freedom's flag across the sun!   I a traitor? Who are you That dare to breathe that word to me? You never wore the Union blue, No wounds attest your loyalty!   I clasp the hand that made my scars, I cheer the flag my foe men bore, I shout for joy to see the stars All on our common shield once more.   I stand and say that you were right, I greet you with uncovered head, Remembering many a thundering fight, Where whistling death between us sped.   Remembering the boys in gray, With thoughts too deep and fine for words, I lift this cup of love to-day To drink what only love affords.

 

Most of the following information was obtained by research at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History in Columbia, South Carolina. I post it here in memory of all who gave of themselves for their homelands: men, women, white, black, Southern, or Northern, between the points of history that took place at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor and at Appomatox Courthouse, Virginia. May history never repeat itself and may long live our reunited United States of America.

The past is dead; let it bury its dead, its hopes, and its aspirations. Before you lies the future, a future full of golden promise, a future of expanding national glory, before which all the world shall stand amazed. Let me beseech you to lay aside all rancor, all bitter sectional feeling, and to take your places in the ranks of those who who will bring about a consummation devoutly to be wished - a reunited country.(From the last speech of Jefferson Davis, delivered when he was almost eighty years old.)

My Company I, 25th Regiment ancestors were:

    Great Great Great Grandfathers
  • Isaac Andrew Haley
  • Friendly Wilder Haley
  • Harvey V. Haley
  • James Owens Lowder

    Great Great Grandfather

  • Joseph Edward Richbourg

Reuben F. Ridgeway was my GGG uncle (brother of Peter E.) and Joseph Newton Ridgeway was my 2nd cousin 4 times removed.

I have more information on some of the Ridgeways and Richbourgs who served with Company I. I will add that data to this information as I have time and do more research.

The following information about their service in the Confederate Army was obtained from microfilm at the South Carolina State Department of Archives and History in Columbia, South Carolina.

Peter Edward Ridgeway

Peter E. Ridgeway was enrolled for Confederate service as a private in Company I of the 7th Regiment South Carolina Cavalry on May 23, 1862 at Sumter, South Carolina for the duration of the war. Prior the 1862, Peter Ridgeway had been a member of the Claremont Cavalry.

Muster Roll
Mar. to Aug. 31, 1864: present, he was paid $73.60 for the use of his horse.
Nov. 5, 1864: Clothing was issued to P.E. Ridgeway
April 9, 1865: Paroled at Appomatox Court House, Virginia CSA 7th Regiment, Company I, Calvary, Private

Information from South Carolina State Archives Records. CSA marker on grave site.

Pension Application # 2723 and 2724. Peter Edward Ridgeway stated that he enlisted in Company I of the 7th regiment under Captain Walsh. On his application, he stated that he enlisted in April of 1861. He was discharged from the service at Appomatax, Virginia on the 9th of April 1865. He received a pension until his death and then his widow, Margaret applied for and received a pension.

Isaac Andrew Haley

Isaac Andrew Haley of Clarendon County, South Carolina enrolled for duty in Confederate Service with the 25th Regiment, Company I South Carolina Volunteers on 1 January 1862 for three years or the duration of the war at Camp Harlee in Georgetown, South Carolina.

Muster Roll
October 31, 1862: sick in camp
Nov. and Dec. 1862: present
Jan. and Feb. 1863: present
Mar. and Apr. 1863: present
May and June 1863: present
Jul. and Aug. 1863: present
Sept. and Oct. 1863: present
Nov. and Dec. 1863: on duty at Ft. Sumter since 29 Dec.
Jan. and Feb. 1864: on duty at Ft. Sumter since 29 Dec. returned 9 Feb. 1864
(During the spring of 1864, the 25th regiment moved to Virginia.)
Mar. 1- Aug. 31, 1864: absent, sick since 23 July 1864
April 28, 1864 : Clothing was issued to I.A. Haley
May 6, 1864: I.A. Haley, occupation, farmer, age 25 was admitted to the South Carolina Hospital, Petersburg, Virginia with an injury described as "V. Con. over upper 3rd sternum." Transferred June 19, 1864.
June 20, 1864: CSA General Hospital, Farmville, Virginia. Returned to duty 12 July 1864. July 20, 1864: Isaac Haley, age 25 of Clarendon District, S.C. was on the list of patients admitted to the South Carolina Hospital in Petersburg, Virginia
July 20, 1864: I.A. Haley is on the list of patients at the Episcopal Hospital in Williamsburg, Virginia. Diagnosis, Februs Typhoides. He released to return to duty on September 4, 1864. Remarks on his record indicate that he had a "specific scar."
Oct. 31, 1864: returned to duty Sept. 25, 1864

Isaac A. Haley's widow applied for a pension under the Act of 1919. Susan Covert Haley stated on the application that her husband Isaac A. Haley was in Confederate service from October of 1861 until he was discharged at Richmond, Virginia on April 9, 1865.

Friendly Wilder Haley

Friendly Wilder Haley enlisted for Confederate service in Company I, 25th Regiment of the South Carolina Volunteers on January 1, 1862 at Camp Harlee in Georgetown, South Carolina. He was 21 years of age and enlisted for 3 years or the duration of the war.

Muster Roll
March and April, 1863: Camp guard
Nov. and Dec. 1863: on duty Ft. Sumter since 29 Dec. '63
Jan. and Feb. 1864: returned from Ft. Sumter 9 Jan, '64
Mar. - Aug. 31, 1864: absent sick since June 18, 1864
April 20 and 29, 1864: clothing issued to F.W. Haley
June 20, 1864: F.W. Haley appears on the register of the Confederate States Hospital, Petersburg, Virginia.
June 26, 1864: Clothing issued to F.W. Haley
July 22, 1864: He was furloughed from the hospital.
Oct. 31, 1864: returned to duty 13 Sept 1864
Dec. 21, 1864: F.W. Haley appears on the morning report of Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Virginia. Diagnosis:pneumonia
Jan. 14, 1865: Returned to duty
Feb. 20, 1865: F.W. Haley was captured near Town Creek
Feb. 28, 1865: F.W. Haley arrived at Point Lookout, Maryland as a Prisoner of War.
June 28, 1865: F.W. Haley's name appears on an Oath of Allegiance at Point Lookout, Maryland, He is described as follows: complexion-dark, hair-brown, eyes-blue, height-5 feet 10 1/4 inches.
June 28, 1865: F.W. Haley was released from Point Lookout, Maryland

Harvey V. Haley

H.V. Haley enlisted for Confederate service in Company I of the 25th Regiment of the South Carolina Volunteers at Camp Harlee, Georgetown, South Carolina on January 1, 1862 for 3 years or the duration of the war. Prior to that he had served in the Clarendon Guard.

Muster Roll
Oct. 31, 1862: present
Nov. and Dec. 1862: no remarks
Jan. and Feb. 1863: no remarks
Mar. and April, 1863: no remarks
May and June, 1863: no remarks
July and Aug, 1863.: no remarks
Sept. and Oct.,1863: Promoted to 2nd Corporal from 3rd on the 2nd of Oct. 1863.
Nov. and Dec. 1863: On duty at Ft. Sumter since 29 Dec.
Jan. and Feb., 1864: Returned from Ft. Sumter 9 Jan. '64
(During the spring of 1864, the 25th Regiment moved to Virginia.)
Mar. to Aug. 31, 1864: present
April 20 and 28, 1864: Clothing was issued to H.V. Haley
May 15, 1864: F.W. Haley was admitted to Jackson Hospital. Diagnosis: Mini ball in left hand
May 22, 1864: Furloughed for 60 days
Aug. 12, 1864: Clothing was issued to F.W. Haley
Oct. 31, 1864: present
Jan. 15, 1865: Captured at Ft. Fisher
Jan. 30, 1865: Received at Elmira, New York as Prisoner of War
Mar. 12, 1865: Died of diarrhea
Mar. 13, 1865: Buried at Elmira Prison in grave #1963

James Owens Lowder

James Owens Lowder enlisted as a private for Confederate Service with Company I, 25th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers in Charleston, South Carolina on May 28, 1862. He enlisted for 3 years or the duration of the war.

Muster Roll
Oct., 1862: present
Nov. and Dec., 1862 : present at Camp Lamb, Wilmington, N.C.
Jan. and Feb., 1863:present at Camp Glover, James Island, S.C.
Mar. and April, 1863: present at Camp Gadberry
May and June, 1863: present at Camp Secessionville, James Island, S.C.
July and Aug., 1863: present at Legares Point, James Island, S.C.
Aug. 20 - Sept. 6, 1863: wounded at some point
Sept. and Oct., 1863: present
Oct. 4, 1863: On casualty list in 1st Military District July 10 -Sept. 6. 1863, wounded slightly at Morris Island, South Carolina
Nov. and Dec. 1863: present
Jan. and Feb. 1864: present at Secessionville, James Island, S.C.
2nd Quarter, 1864: Clothing issued to J.O. Lowder
Mar. - Aug. 1864: detached on Engineer Corps. since 15 Aug.
Mar. - Aug. 1864: company stationed at Petersburg, Va.
Oct. 1864: In the field near Richmond, Va.
Jan. 15, 1865: Captured at Ft. Fisher, North Carolina
Jan. 30, 1865: Received at Elmira Prison in New York as a prisoner of war
June 23, 1865: Signed oath of Allegiance at Elmira and released; description as follows: complexion-dark, hair-dark, eyes-hazel, height-5 ft. 8 in. Place of residence listed as Kingstree, South Carolina

Joseph Edward Richbourg

Joseph Edward Richbourg enlisted for Confederate Service with Company I, 25th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers at Camp Harlee in Georgetown, South Carolina on January 1, 1862. He enlisted for 3 years or the duration of the war.

Muster Roll
Nov. and Dec., 1862: present
Jan. and Feb., 1863: present
Mar. and Apr., 1863:present
May and June, 1863: present
July and Aug., 1863: present
Sept. and Oct., 1863: present
Oct. 4, 1863: On casualty list in 1st Military District July 10 -Sept. 6. 1863, wounded slightly at Morris Island, South Carolina
Nov. and Dec. 1863: present
Jan. and Feb. 1864: present
Mar. 1- Aug. 31, 1864: absent, sick since June 30, 1864
(During the spring of 1864 the 25th Regiment was sent to Virginia.)
July 8, 1864: Admitted to General Hospital, Petersburg, Virginia; diagnosis: hemorrhoids
Sept. 12, 1864: Returned to duty
Jan. 15, 1865: Captured at Ft. Fisher, North Carolina
Jan. 30, 1865: Received at Elmira Prison in New York as a prisoner of war
June 23, 1865: Signed oath of Allegiance at Elmira and released; description as follows: complexion-florid, hair-brown, eyes-hazel, height-5 ft. 9 in. Place of residence listed as Kingstree, South Carolina

Civil War Pension Application #2721. Joseph E. Richbourg enlisted in Company I of the 25th Regiment. He served under Captain Plowden from April 1861 until 22 June 1865.

Joseph Newton Ridgeway

J.N. Ridgeway enlisted for confederate service on January 1, 1862 in Company I, 25th Regiment of the South Carolina Volunteers at Camp Harlee in Georgetown, South Carolina. He was a cousin of my great great grandfather, Peter Edward Ridgeway.

Muster Roll
Nov. and Dec., 1862: sick in camp
Jan. and Feb., 1863: sick in camp
Mar. and April, 1863: present
May and June, 1863: present
July and Aug., 1863: present
Sept. and Oct., 1863: present
Nov. 29, 1864: Jackson Hospital
Nov. and Dec., 1863: on furlough since 31 Dec. 1863
Jan. and Feb. 1864: returned from 7 days furlough 7 Jan.
Mar. 1 - Aug. 31, 1864: present
(During the spring of 1865, the 25th regiment removed to Virginia.)
Oct. 31, 1864: absent sick since Sept. 16, 1864
Jan. 15, 1865: Captured at Ft. Fisher, North Carolina
Jan. 30, 1865: Received at Elmira Prison, New York
Mar. 14, 1865: Transferred for exchange, paroled at Elmira and sent to James River

Reuben F. Ridgeway

Sergeant Reuben F. Ridgeway enlisted for Confederate Service at Camp Stono. He enlisted with Company I of the 25th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers for 3 years or until the end of the war. He was the brother of my great great grandfather, Peter Edward Ridgeway.

Muster Roll
Oct. 31, 1862: present
Jan. and Feb.,1863: present
Mar. and April, 1863: present
May and June, 1863: present
June 25, 1863: elected sergeant from the rank of private
July and Aug., 1863: present
Sept. and Oct., 1863: present
Nov. and Dec., 1863: present Jan. and Feb., 1864: present
Mar. 1 - Aug. 31, 1864: absent, wounded since 7 May 1864; without leave since 29 Aug. 1864
(During the spring of 1864, the 25th Regiment removed to Virginia.)
March 4, 1864: General Hospital, Howards Grove, Richmond, Virginia
March 4, 1864: Transferred to Hospital No. 9
May 7, 1864: Episcopal Hospital, Williamsburg, Virginia; V.S. through right arm
June 19, 1864: transferred to South Carolina Hospital, Petersburg, Virginia, occupation listed as farmer
July 5, 1864: Clothing issued to R.F. Ridgeway
Oct. 31, 1864: returned Oct. 20, 1864
Dec. 26, 1864: CSA Military Hospital, Wilmington, North Carolina, diagnosis: catarrh. Listed as from Manning, S.C.
Dec. 27, 1864: Transferred to hospital in Goldsboro, North Carolina
Jan. 15, 1865: captured at Ft. Fisher, North Carolina
Jan. 30, 1865: received at Elmira
Feb. 20, 1865: Transferred and sent to James River for exchange
May 15, 1865: Appears on report of parolees given as Prisoners of War by D.M. Evans, Col. 20 New York Cavalry from the 15 of May, inclusive.

Ode by Henry Timrod   Sleep sweetly in your humble graves, Sleep, martyrs of a fallen cause; Though yet no marble column craves The pilgrim her to pause.   In seeds of laurel in the earth The blossom of your fame is blown, And somewhere, waiting for its birth, The shaft is in the stone!   Meanwhile, behalf the tardy years Which keep in trust your storied tombs, Behold, your sisters bring their tears, And these memorial blooms.   Small tributes! but your shades will smile More proudly on these wreaths to-day, Than when some cannon-moulded pile Shall overlook this bay.   Stoop, angels, hither from the skies, There is no holier spot of ground Than where defeated valor lies, By mourning beauty crowned.

 

Company I, 25th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers

Company I, 23rd Regiment South Carolina Volunteers

Company H, 26th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers

Company K, 23rd Regiment South Carolina Volunteers

 

All of the information included here is from the personal research of Cynthia Ridgeway Parker. Most of this data was found in records at the South Carolina State Department of Archives and History. Other amateur genealogists are welcome to print a copy of the information contained upon this page for their own use, but this web page may not be republished in any form nor used for any commercial purposes. Non profit genealogical societies are welcome to place a copy of this data in their archives as long as this disclaimer remains on the document.

1997 - 2001 © Cynthia Ridgeway Parker

This page was last updated on

April 7, 2001